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Exploring Rock Art or Rock Writing in the Southwest     

Telephone:  435-627-1086           Email:  exploringrockart@gmail.com        Address: 1234 West Red Butte, Washington, UT 84780

            

New Ebooks - Rock Art Ranch, AZ. - Sloan Canyon, NV. - Eve Site, NV. - Equinox at Bear Shaman, UT - Buffington Pockets, NV - Dry Lakes, NV

2014 - our major planned trip will be to Idaho - If you can help us identify and locate sites in Idaho please contact us.          

April 2014 Site Visits - MA Pictograph Panel - Tuckup Canyon Shaman's Gallery (ebook), Eve Site (ebook)

And Bishop, California 11 sites.    A very exciting, interesting set of site reviews with ebooks available on each site.

May visits:  Sloan Canyon (ebook), TQSTG, Jackson Red Sands (3 sites), Upper Arrow Canyon, Jackson Wash

June visit:  Kane Springs (ebook)

July visit:  HD Site

 Exploring Rock Art is a valuable resource for Archaeologists and those familiar with Rock Art sites in the Southwest.  Use the Ebook feature as you plan your Rock Art visits.

  Exploring Rock Art is dedicated to preserving Native American Rock Writing (Petroglyphs and Pictographs).  The sites are disappearing rapidly with natural degradation, residential and corporate development and expansion, plus intentional damage or destruction.  And BLM states they cannot protect all the sites.  The Rock Art belongs to the citizens of the United States.  We do have the right to view the sites and an obligation to protect them.  Leaving the site in the same or better condition (possibly picking up some trash) is important to the Native Americans and to preservation of the site.  Accordingly more responsible visitation should be our goal.

Recording these sites is necessary for future generations to enjoy and study them.  We try to preserve the site information through our Ebook Project and Photos.

Check for Ebook Availability

Exploring Rock Art publishes a series of books titled "A Visitor's Guide to the Rock Art of Site Name"

The emphasis will be on the Rock Art of the Southwest United States.  For more information see

www.exploringrockart.com/ebook_program.htm.

Photos Available

               

       

Note the presentation on Rock Art Etiquette.  I have observed several undesirable acts on field trips, reviewed many pictures and feel that certain actions need to be corrected - by education.

www.exploringrockart.com and the Coalition to Preserve Rock Art believe that education of the public and also the governing authorities, will aid in the Preservation of Rock Art.

That is our objective.  Enthuse interested parties and the public with the grandeur of Rock Art locations and the possibilities of preserving or protecting the sites.  BLM readily admits they cannot protect all the sites, and they should welcome the interest and involvement of responsible and concerned citizens.  The people of the United States can accomplish a lot when they set their minds to it.  If a sufficient amount of people become seriously involved (gain an appreciation) and put pressure on fellow citizens and on the government, we can save some of the sites presently endangered.  Government projects (particularly Oil and Gas Drilling, Water piping, etc.), industrial expansion, residential growth, and disrespectful citizens are the real problems to the Preservation Process.  Let's convert those that we can from problems (enemies) to assets (friends).

Devoted to:

AWARENESS . EDUCATION . PRESERVATION

of

Native American or Indian - Rock Art or Rock Writing

A Conversation in late June 2010 in a Northern Arizona BLM Office (my comments in black):

Do you have any Native American Rock Art sites in the area?

Receptionist - Our Archaeologist does not talk about them.

What's the notebook on the table labeled Petroglyphs?

I don't know - and then she handed it to me - the notebook had a few pictures of petroglyphs but more information about plants, geology, etc.  And then a male archaeologist walked into the lobby.

You know there is an ongoing debate on whether more visitation or less visitation to Rock Art sites is better?

We don't talk about Rock Art sites and anybody taking the position of more visitation is just wanting to view the sites.

OK

We recently had significant damage at a local site.

And was the damage at a private BLM site or a publicly known site?

Silence  -   Silence  -   Silence  -   And then a frustrated silent walk away

------------------

The point that I get out of this conversation is that some BLM officials don't care as much about Rock Art as we do. There are many others that advocate preservation and we should be in contact with them regularly to report and discuss site locations and to report damage (feedback to the interested party, or the reporting part, should be a necessity.  I and others are very disappointed by the lack of feedback and the noting of any positive action taken - prosecution, reprimand, signage, more regular visitation by site stewards).  However, a few are more interesting in upholding their interpretation of "policy" whether it's right or wrong, and are not interested in getting the right people involved.  Also, there are generally no local Educational Programs regarding the correct way to review a site (and the wrong way of handling a site visitation) sponsored by the BLM.  BLM needs a comprehensive, focused program on Preservation with invitations to the Public to regularly attend.  The plan of hiding site information from the public (some of the public does know the site locations), not divulging, does not always work when there is no alternative plan available.  Our thoughts are expressed at Rock Art Etiquette on this website.

In 2010, one day previous to the above discussion, we visited a site at Cloride, Arizona advertised by a billboard and with directions by the Cloride Chamber of Commerce and saw a site with no recent damage.  There were many visitors (4 cars while we were there).  So again the question - which provided better preservation - more visitation or less visitation?  We visited Cloride again in December 2012 for better pictures and found no damage.  Good job, Public, keep it up, it is important.

The answer to the question of more or less visitation is not evident yet.  Somebody knows about all the sites (hiker, explorer, ATV'r, horseback rider, gps mapper, geo-caching participants, etc. - I have seen all of these groups at Rock Art sites and you probably have also), we can only hope that "the good guys" know about the sites.  But observing the damage that we discover, we know that's not true.  More Education is needed and it doesn't seem to be forthcoming.

We have also visited many Arizona Rock Art sites which have tremendous signage and sufficient warnings, mostly in Southern Arizona, so this is not knocking Arizona as a whole, just knocking closed mindedness.  Many in Arizona believe in, and are proponents of more Education.  I wish more were.

Regarding Rock Art, BLM Archaeologist Sarah (Sally) Cunkelman is reported to have said "Ultimately these sites belong to the public, and protection of them is up to the American people."

True.  !!!!!!!!!!

And that's the reason for an organization like the Coalition to Preserve Rock Art and for www.exploringrockart.com to exist.

THIS SITE IS DEDICATED TO THE PRESERVATION OF ROCK ART.  THE PRIMARY NEEDS ARE TO MAKE THE COMMUNITY AWARE OF THE IMPORTANCE OF THE ROCK ART AND THEN PROVIDE EDUCATION ON THE WAYS TO PREVENT DESTRUCTION AND DAMAGE TO THE SITE.  BLM IS RELUCTANT TO UNDERTAKE THE EDUCATION PROCESS SO MAYBE THEY SHOULD RELY ON ORGANIZATIONS SUCH AS OURS TO DO IT.

THE PRIMARY TOOL TO ACCOMPLISH THIS EDUCAION IS THE COALITION TO PRESERVE ROCK ART.   IN ADDITION MANY OTHER ORGANIZATIONS HAVE A SERIOUS AGENDA TO THE PRESERVATION PROCESS. 

THE COALITION TO PRESERVE ROCK ART REGULARLY GIVES PRESENTATIONS TO GROUPS INTERESTED IN THE ISSUES AND DISTRIBUTES INFORMATION TO THE COMMUNITY TO ASSIST IN THE EFFORT.  THE COALITION ALSO IS CURRENTLY ADDING MEMBERS AND SHOULD YOU BE INTERESTED, PLEASE SEE THE MEMBERSHIP FORMS SHOWN UNDER THE COALITION TO PRESERVE ROCK ART PAGE.  NO MEMBERSHIP DUES, WE JUST REQUEST YOUR SUPPORT AND YOU WILL BE ADDED TO OUR EMAIL LIST.

     

Specific location information will only be given for those sites with public information already available -  either by a government agency, in a book, or previously appearing on a website.  Specific location information will not be given on sites that are relatively unexplored or if the information is not already in the public domain.  We do intend to cooperate with validated researchers who are interesting in sharing information.

        You can help us and you by joining the Coalition to Preserve Rock Art.  Please get involved.

    FOLLOW US ON exploringrockart.blogspot

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